How 2 questions took 1 hour to solve

I was responding to a post by Dan Meyer about his awesome recent talk at NCTM. Here’s what I wrote in my comment:

I am working hard to keep engagement high. This week, we actually started with two blank triangles, one right and one obtuse. I asked kids to solve the triangle, and ask me questions. There were no measurements on the triangles. The triangles were to scale. They could ask me for one value.

From there, they had to measure another part of the triangle and let the solving begin. They could only measure one other part, no more. So, depending on what they chose, they would use different tools to solve the rest of the triangles. They used rulers or protractors, ratios, triangle sum rule, right triangle trigonometry and Laws of Sines/Cosines. They worked in groups to try to figure out what information they needed, they worked together to try different strategies. In the end, the only way they knew the answers were correct was by rationalizing whether or not they made sense.

We spent 1 hour on two problems. Engagement was high, completion rates were nearly 100%, participation was 100%. It was a really great day for me and I was able to coach them. They did the lifting. It was great. Great conversations.

So much of Dan’s work inspires mine. I love his 3-act-math ideas, though I don’t use them much. More so, I respond to the idea of opening up questions. I love the idea of putting out a skeleton and asking kids what they need. They actually answer, they actually engage in the problem and start to think and ask questions. Once they are invested like that, they don’t like to give up. Giving up has been like an epidemic in mid level high school math classes like geometry and Algebra 2.

Today’s geometry warm up looked like this:2016-04-22-13.44.41.jpg.jpg

We didn’t even get to the third problem. Yes, it was hand drawn. Like, free hand. That actually made the problem kind of interesting because I don’t really have a right triangle, do I? Just almost one. So, depending on what side or angle students measured (by the way I told them the base side of the triangles in both problems one and two was 15 units) the answers they got might be a bit different.

It was also a great talking point about how real life problems are rarely perfect and we rarely get to check the back of the book to see if we did it right. We have to trust our methods and our team.

Great conversations. Such a great day. It was hard for some of them to keep going to finish the second problem. They were a bit tapped out. We have block schedules, which means 90 minute periods. This took way longer than I expected. But, totally worth it. We’ll do the third problem next week. They actually asked for a book assignment when we were done. I guess their brains were tired. But, they did it! And, they did really well! Go team!

More about problem three in another post. Maybe.

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