Monthly Archives: October 2016

Partner Quiz + Evaluation = Fingers Crossed!

Last week I gave a partner quiz to my Algebra II classes.They liked the quiz and seemed to be highly engaged. The rules were simple. Work with a partner – open note, open book, scientific calculator – all allowed. I was also being observed and evaluated by one of our Assistant Principals. So, I had my fingers crossed that everything would go well.

My job was in the partnering and in giving feedback during the quiz. My goal was to give each partnership feedback as they worked. The feedback came in the form of green dot (correct) or pink dot (not quite correct). Or no dot, if a problem was in progress or not started.

As I moved through the tables with my two highlighters, kids were very excited and filled with anticipation as I examined their quizzes and marked either green or pink. Some errors were small – losing track of a negative or not writing the plus/minus symbols in front of the answer to a square root problem. Those things they could find themselves usually. Other errors were bigger, more along the lines of not fully understanding the question or how to start a solution.

When students were not understanding how to start on a solution or not understanding the language of the problem, I was able to discover this gap and then help out. All students were getting feedback and I was learning who needed more help. The nice part, was that I was able to check in with every student multiple times during class and help them where they were. It felt like a pretty good differentiation strategy on hindsight. I didn’t realize that going in to this activity.

The first round of me going through the room was just to give green or pink dots. I didn’t give much help or feedback beyond that for most pairs. I would approach each pair of students and look only at one person’s quiz. The next round I would look at the other person’s quiz and give deeper feedback as needed.

By the end, I had several pairs of students who had completed every problem correctly. I asked them to help out certain students who were having questions or just wanted to know if they were getting green dots on the rest of the problems I hadn’t checked or on any pink dots that needed to be looked at again. By the end of class, everyone had reached 100% green. Well, almost everyone. Two students returned during our study hour to get some more help and finish up. Then everyone had green dots.

I did ask for feedback about the quiz process. The students seemed to like it and wanted to do it again. I got a couple of suggestions for improving the system of checking at the end. Next time, I’ll give the students who finish early a green and pink highlighter just like mine so they can officially check quizzes of students who are finished and waiting.

So, while I didn’t want to give a quiz during an observation lesson, this type to be good for an evaluation. Overall, I think it was an engaged class period where students and teacher learned in a formative way about mastery of concepts. It was low risk and ended in better understandings for all students. A couple of students reported that they learned from the quiz. Excellent.

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Student feedback

As far as the evaluation part, my Assistant Principal gave me some ideas for managing the quiz differently next time. One suggestion that I liked was about having each student in the partnership have a different version of the questions and the other one have the solutions. That way they could coach each other. I think that would work well for a maximum of 5-10 problems and would be a good idea to use as an assessment activity after a few lessons. I could circulate and listen to conversations and help out with guiding how students could coach each other. I think it would have been too long of an activity during midterm level review (which this was), covering  good deal of content. But, I will use that idea sometime in the next month. It sounds like a great way to have students use and learn the vocabulary, too.

It was a great day for learning in my classroom.

The kids were a bit unruly today…

I take that unruliness as a challenge to work on a more engaging experience for them. Today I was teaching polynomial expression operations, which is, admittedly, one of the more nuts and bolts type of topics and not terribly exciting math. This blog post is about how to find ways to raise the engagement on some of the dryer topics that we cover.

And, what’s ‘dry’ to me means that I can’t readily think of great activities, applications, or problems that engage. 

To create a higher level of interest is to create a higher engagement level. This means less need for a disciplined atmosphere centered on direct instruction when the kids are just not in the mood. Which is often in my 5th period (after lunch) class.

The kids are energetic, they are social and they are comfortable enough that they interrupt, throw stuff and eat candy, throwing the wrappers on the floor, sometimes near the garbage can. God bless ’em. 🙂 I really do love these kids and I have fun with them. BUT, I do have a hard time getting through direct instruction for 20-30 minutes, so it drags out longer, which makes it even tougher for me and for them. Way too much!! Especially for the half of the class that is quietly waiting to get through a concept or problem.

Let me say, direct instruction has it’s place, but it’s not working well for me with this group. So, I need options. First stop: Desmos. What great activities already exist for us?

So many! Here’s a link to the classroom activities that come up when I search on Polynomial Functions: http://bit.ly/2drqtGd and a screen shot of the list. If you haven’t already, please set up a teacher account at Create Desmos Teacher Account and get inspired!

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It think for polynomial function operations, though, I’m not really seeing anything that I could use. Bummer. Hmm… Let me think about a flipped approach.

What if I had thought sooner about this being a dryer topic and had planned in advance? I might have had student preview the material, using a YouTube video or checking out Flipped Math’s Algebra 2 topics. Ah, yes, there it is. Here’s a screen shot of the webpage with a video lesson and some links at the bottom, where kids can print the notes sheet or do an assignment. In the past I’ve printed the notes sheet ahead of time, made copies and distributed them during the previous class.

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At the site, you can click the Semester 2 tab, then click polynomial functions, there’s a lesson for operations. The site provides a student note page that students can print and fill out while they watch the video. This way, they have guided notes, they can go at their own pace, and they can ask questions when they get to class. In class, we can quickly summarize the key concepts and ask questions. They can do that in groups, or as a whole class.

Would this really help in terms of engagement? Well, hard to say, but at least I wouldn’t be trying to hold their attention so long when it’s just physically hard for them to stay tuned. They would get a very similar experience of direct instruction, just when they are not in a group with their friends after lunch on a warm day. So, I think it’s an improvement, but it’s not exactly innovative or exciting. 

Next, if I do the flipped math for instruction, what activity could I have this energetic group do during class? One option is some sort of matching activity. But, wouldn’t it be better to do a live matching activity where they are the variables? Like, everyone gets to be a cubed-x or a squared-x or a single-x or a constant term? Then, I could write problems on the board and they could group themselves as the equation and solution, and maybe make a video, and maybe put it on YouTube and maybe I could tweet it and blog about it. 🙂 Wow, I’m gonna do that next time.

Another option is to create some open questions. Ways to do this include using some closed questions, like most of the text book questions and simply withholding some of the information and/or instructions, then ask students what are we going to try to solve and what information do you need?

If only I had thought ahead. Well, for me, next time as I look ahead in my planning, I’m going to be a bit more proactive for the sake of this particular class.

Direct instruction + Dry topic = Headache by the end of the block. Never again. 🙂

My Classroom Culture Is Shifting

Well, it looks like the past six weeks of having students sit in groups and emphasizing that they work together is possibly paying off. Today, instead of hearing, “I have a question…” I heard “We have a question…”

That was beautiful to me. I had just rearranged the seating chart. At our school, we have moved into our second of three grading periods for the semester. These kids knew to work together with their new partners, and they were doing it. They knew I was pretty much only answering questions no one in the group could answer. They are learning to check in with the other students in the group before asking me for individual help.

I highly recommend this type of group seating and emphasis on student-to-student communication. It’s been so helpful to have students talking to each other about math. This should happen during warm-ups, work times, activities, and class discussions. To get them to start talking to each other, I sometimes ask why something works a certain way and ask them to discuss it with each other. Then, I might walk from group to group to check in with the group. Then I might summarize for the class what I learned from the groups.

Full disclosure: I used to be afraid to have them “Discuss at your tables…” because I was afraid they would talk about other things. And, that was often true because I was letting them sit with their friends. Better to mix them up. I first made a seating chart that was alphabetical. That was helpful to get to know their names and faces and to check off homework and take attendance quickly. Now that I know them better, I mix up the seating thinking about male/female, test scores, personalities, etc. I plan to change the seating every grading period. We have six throughout the year.

Groups are working better than two partners. I think it’s because students have more people to talk to who might know the answer. It’s important for me as the teacher to circulate to each group several times during the class period. I ask if the table has any questions. If there are questions, I ask if anyone at the table can answer. Then, if so, I’ll listen to that discussion and help if needed. Or, I’ll walk to the next group and repeat. I try to only answer what students can’t answer.

Students learn that I’m available and want to help, but can’t take the time to answer every single question from every single student. It’s like an economic situation where the teacher’s time is the scarce resource. Students are learning to make their questions be worthwhile to their group.