Partner Quiz + Evaluation = Fingers Crossed!

Last week I gave a partner quiz to my Algebra II classes.They liked the quiz and seemed to be highly engaged. The rules were simple. Work with a partner – open note, open book, scientific calculator – all allowed. I was also being observed and evaluated by one of our Assistant Principals. So, I had my fingers crossed that everything would go well.

My job was in the partnering and in giving feedback during the quiz. My goal was to give each partnership feedback as they worked. The feedback came in the form of green dot (correct) or pink dot (not quite correct). Or no dot, if a problem was in progress or not started.

As I moved through the tables with my two highlighters, kids were very excited and filled with anticipation as I examined their quizzes and marked either green or pink. Some errors were small – losing track of a negative or not writing the plus/minus symbols in front of the answer to a square root problem. Those things they could find themselves usually. Other errors were bigger, more along the lines of not fully understanding the question or how to start a solution.

When students were not understanding how to start on a solution or not understanding the language of the problem, I was able to discover this gap and then help out. All students were getting feedback and I was learning who needed more help. The nice part, was that I was able to check in with every student multiple times during class and help them where they were. It felt like a pretty good differentiation strategy on hindsight. I didn’t realize that going in to this activity.

The first round of me going through the room was just to give green or pink dots. I didn’t give much help or feedback beyond that for most pairs. I would approach each pair of students and look only at one person’s quiz. The next round I would look at the other person’s quiz and give deeper feedback as needed.

By the end, I had several pairs of students who had completed every problem correctly. I asked them to help out certain students who were having questions or just wanted to know if they were getting green dots on the rest of the problems I hadn’t checked or on any pink dots that needed to be looked at again. By the end of class, everyone had reached 100% green. Well, almost everyone. Two students returned during our study hour to get some more help and finish up. Then everyone had green dots.

I did ask for feedback about the quiz process. The students seemed to like it and wanted to do it again. I got a couple of suggestions for improving the system of checking at the end. Next time, I’ll give the students who finish early a green and pink highlighter just like mine so they can officially check quizzes of students who are finished and waiting.

So, while I didn’t want to give a quiz during an observation lesson, this type to be good for an evaluation. Overall, I think it was an engaged class period where students and teacher learned in a formative way about mastery of concepts. It was low risk and ended in better understandings for all students. A couple of students reported that they learned from the quiz. Excellent.

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Student feedback

As far as the evaluation part, my Assistant Principal gave me some ideas for managing the quiz differently next time. One suggestion that I liked was about having each student in the partnership have a different version of the questions and the other one have the solutions. That way they could coach each other. I think that would work well for a maximum of 5-10 problems and would be a good idea to use as an assessment activity after a few lessons. I could circulate and listen to conversations and help out with guiding how students could coach each other. I think it would have been too long of an activity during midterm level review (which this was), covering  good deal of content. But, I will use that idea sometime in the next month. It sounds like a great way to have students use and learn the vocabulary, too.

It was a great day for learning in my classroom.

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