Measuring an Economy

Today I’m giving a presentation at the College of Marin to the hiring committee for the Social Studies department. I’m applying to teach Economics. I’ve taught at COM in the past, in the Business Department. Since then, I earned my teaching credential in mathematics and economics and an MS in Education to add to my other MA in Economics. So, I should feel well prepared, but I’m nervous, of course.

They asked me to give a 20-minute lesson where I “utilize current economic models to introduce students to contemporary issues of development, underdevelopment, and globalization.”

Hmmm… Twenty minutes worth. How will I narrow this down?

Well, what are contemporary issues in globalization? I’ve recently read Hillbilly Elegy. In that book, the author K.D. Vance, tells a story that spans several generations of his family who moved from Appalachian Kentucky to a steel town in Ohio, only to see the industry become automated and globalized away. Those are contemporary issues, for sure and they fit in with economic models of unemployment and GDP.

I created a powerpoint presentation that I’m sharing here. It looks at the Phillips Curve, GDP and other ways to measure the wellbeing of a nation. I use a lot of indicators and resources to get the audience to think about other measures that define the health of a nation and we compare them across the globe. I end the presentation with some summary information about what would make a nation developed or underdeveloped and we do an activity that highlights those ideas.

In the end, globalization can be helpful and harmful. As we globalize, we have a long way to go in terms of equality.

COM Presentation 04302019

 

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